Life. Ghana. And The World. Blog

saveitjustforme:

king-najma:

cosbyykidd:

universecity88:

Black male doctors nothing more dangerous than educated black men

Shout out to the D9

the dude in front is most definitely a obgyn lol

Mmmmm yez yez

(via midfight)

Chillin on campus yesterday. #UMassBoston

Chillin on campus yesterday. #UMassBoston

I have a lot to accomplish at my new school. With a major in #sociology and minor in #english, I’ve got to go hard and try to finish with honors insha’Allah. The weight of the world has been placed on my shoulders, it doesn’t stop because I have my associates, but counties from there. I can do this, like many obstacles and challenge I have come across in life with skill, determination, Allah, experience, good support on my side I can get it done. I have many paths to trail blaze, and UMass Boston is the place for me to continue on the trail. #Ghanaian

I have a lot to accomplish at my new school. With a major in #sociology and minor in #english, I’ve got to go hard and try to finish with honors insha’Allah. The weight of the world has been placed on my shoulders, it doesn’t stop because I have my associates, but counties from there. I can do this, like many obstacles and challenge I have come across in life with skill, determination, Allah, experience, good support on my side I can get it done. I have many paths to trail blaze, and UMass Boston is the place for me to continue on the trail. #Ghanaian

kemetic-dreams:

Abstract
Since the Herskovitsโ€Frazier debate of the 1940s, African diasporic research in the Americas has been marked not only by an uninterrupted focus on West Africa but also by an equally incessant neglect of the Akan. Accounting for 10 percent of the total number of African captives who embarked for the Americas, the Akan diaspora not only shaped and brought into sharp relief the diasporic themes of maroonage, resistance, and freedom but also complicated these themes in that the displaced Akan created their own social orders based on foundational cultural understandings. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Akan never constituted a majority among other Africans in the Americas, yet their leadership skills in warfare and political organization, medicinal knowledge of plant use and spiritual practice, and composite culture as archived in the musical traditions, language, and patterns of African diasporic life far surpassed what their actual numbers would suggest. The book argues that a composite culture calibrated between the Gold Coast (Ghana) littoral and the forest fringe made the contributions of the Akan diaspora possible. That argument calls attention to the historic formation of Akan culture in West Africa and its reach into the Americas, where the Akan experience in the former British, Danish, and Dutch colonies is explored. There, those early experiences foreground the contemporary movement of diasporic Africans and the Akan people between Ghana and North America. Indeed, the Akan experience provides for a better understanding of how the diasporic quilt came to be and is still becoming.

(via sheluvlike)

kemetic-dreams:

The Kabyle myth is a racialist concept created from the 1830s onwards by French travellers and settlers claiming the moral and cultural superiority of Kabyle Berbers over the neighbouring Arabs and their closeness to Europeans in both physical and European respects. Although ultimately a failure for French colonial authorities, this myth still has a major influence on modern Berber nationalist ideology.

kemetic-dreams:

The Kabyle myth is a racialist concept created from the 1830s onwards by French travellers and settlers claiming the moral and cultural superiority of Kabyle Berbers over the neighbouring Arabs and their closeness to Europeans in both physical and European respects. Although ultimately a failure for French colonial authorities, this myth still has a major influence on modern Berber nationalist ideology.

(via sheluvlike)

baby-doll-mein-sonay-di:

sincerelylizzy:

Yes ๐Ÿ‘โœŒ๏ธ


๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿ™Œ

baby-doll-mein-sonay-di:

sincerelylizzy:

Yes ๐Ÿ‘โœŒ๏ธ

๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿ™Œ

(Source: ayvette95, via losinguselesspride)